Posts Tagged ‘plum’

Spring is here 2010!

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It seems like we have spent months of rain and cold, snow here and there… finally spring has arrived! March gave us one week of fantastic sunshine and a bit of hope until the rain started again. But the temperature is now creeping up and this is told by the many buds on the trees and plants.

Plum Tree Pruning – Take 2

Plum Tree

Plum Tree

Last weekend I had my first go at pruning the plum tree and after a comment from a visitor to the blog it seemed that I had done it all wrong.  Indeed, after taking the good person’s advice and googling “topping off” it became clear that I had make a bit of a mistake with it all.   So today, I revisited the tree and had a go at sorting it out.    Just cutting at will the branches and “topping off” promotes greater amount of new growth on the cut parts and so I suppose you end up with a bit of trouble during the growing season with the bits at the cutting growing a lot faster than elsewhere and possibly resulting in a bit of a uneven tree.

Following my reading up during the week, I tackled all the large branches that I have just left pointing up and took them down to more suitable points in the tree.   My first attempted here again, but hopefully a lot better with the main branches cut way below the rest of the tree meaning new more rapid growth lower down within the tree instead of at the top.

I am not fully sure if I have done it right still, but possibly a better attempt than last week?   Either way, we saved some of the off cuts to make “log pets”.   We have a mixture here, the ones with three eyes or one eyes are not mistakes, they are alien log pets!

Plum Tree Pruning – Take 2

Plum Tree

Plum Tree

Last weekend I had my first go at pruning the plum tree and after a comment from a visitor to the blog it seemed that I had done it all wrong. Indeed, after taking the good person’s advice and googling “topping off” it became clear that I had make a bit of a mistake with it all. So today, I revisited the tree and had a go at sorting it out. Just cutting at will the branches and “topping off” promotes greater amount of new growth on the cut parts and so I suppose you end up with a bit of trouble during the growing season with the bits at the cutting growing a lot faster than elsewhere and possibly resulting in a bit of a uneven tree.

Following my reading up during the week, I tackled all the large branches that I have just left pointing up and took them down to more suitable points in the tree. My first attempted here again, but hopefully a lot better with the main branches cut way below the rest of the tree meaning new more rapid growth lower down within the tree instead of at the top.

I am not fully sure if I have done it right still, but possibly a better attempt than last week? Either way, we saved some of the off cuts to make “log pets”. We have a mixture here, the ones with three eyes or one eyes are not mistakes, they are alien log pets!

Pruning the plum tree

before Pruning the Plum Tree

This is our cherry tree that grows plums (a long story explained in previous posts).  During the summer we did notice that a small bit of pruning might be needed during the next winter as it was causing a shadow on most of the grass and the flower beds.  It was not until I looked at a photo of the tree as it was three years ago that I noticed it has more than doubled in size during that time.  It would seem when we bought the house this tree had just been planted, and cherry trees (or indeed plum trees) as they are, grow pretty fast.   The photo showed a tiny tree just reaching the top of the fence and a small part of the flower bed it is in.  When I looked outside, the tree now reaches the first floor window and is the dominating part of the flower bed.

A more drastic pruning was needed and today I spent the afternoon with stepladder and saw being as drastic as I could with the tree without hopefully doing it too much damage.   The task made a little bit tricky by the solar powered fairy lights that we put in it a couple of years ago, trying to spot the cable within the branches and not cutting it!

The garden now looks and feels a lot lighter and larger.   Come spring and summer time we shall see that affect it all has.

Pruning the Plum Tree

before Pruning the Plum Tree

This is our cherry tree that grows plums (a long story explained in previous posts). During the summer we did notice that a small bit of pruning might be needed during the next winter as it was causing a shadow on most of the grass and the flower beds. It was not until I looked at a photo of the tree as it was three years ago that I noticed it has more than doubled in size during that time. It would seem when we bought the house this tree had just been planted, and cherry trees (or indeed plum trees) as they are, grow pretty fast. The photo showed a tiny tree just reaching the top of the fence and a small part of the flower bed it is in. When I looked outside, the tree now reaches the first floor window and is the dominating part of the flower bed.

A more drastic pruning was needed and today I spent the afternoon with stepladder and saw being as drastic as I could with the tree without hopefully doing it too much damage. The task made a little bit tricky by the solar powered fairy lights that we put in it a couple of years ago, trying to spot the cable within the branches and not cutting it!

The garden now looks and feels a lot lighter and larger. Come spring and summer time we shall see that affect it all has.

Plums everywhere apart from on the tree!

I was so delighted the other month to find out out that our non flowering cherry tree had "turned into" a fully fruiting plum tree.  The small plums, when turned dark and ripened, are really juicy and full of flavor.   So it is a pity that with high winds and birds most of the yet to fully ripen plums fell off the tree before I had chance to eat many of them.    A pity, and the job of clearing them up on a daily basis from the grass was not a nice one.   A bit unsure of what to do with them all (they really were not nice tasting while still yellow) I gave them all to the worms in the wormary.  I wondered if I may have had flooded the worms a bit too much with one food type, but they seemed to love it – although now I do think actually my vermicompost is now going to be full of plum stones.  Whoops.

A Cherry Tree with Plums

Our garden has an ornamental cherry tree which has always been nice, given fantastic blossom in the spring and much wanted shade at times in the summer.   I always thought that it I had planted the tree I would had planted a proper full blown cherry tree as I always feel just a little bit cheated by having something that is so close to bearing yummy fruit and yet it is just there to look nice instead.

Well a bit of a surprise this year as after the blossom had come and gone and the leaves were well established I started to spot one or two small green "berries" appearing.  These got larger and larger and it started to look like the tree was beginning to revert back to fruiting (is this possible I ask myself?).    Not only were these cherries getting bigger and bigger, but when they started to turn a more red colour they looked like massive really nice cherries worthy of any fruit bowl and I was really starting to get excited.

The weeks went past and more and more of these cherry appeared and as they grew, the more they started to look a bit less like cherries and more like small plums.  Not being too up on cherries then I assumed these were just massive plum looking cherries and most eager to taste my first one.   Then, a relative who was visiting and knows a lot more about these things than I do and so I showed him the tree and he said it looked like a very promising plum tree to him!  Totally puzzled at why this tree would start fruiting after the last 5+ years, he suggested he had never heard of that happening before.

So I picked a "cherry", I eat it, I tasted yummy small and sweet and very juicy plum.  What a result, my very own fruiting ornamental plum tree!